Issues With The Internal Revenue Service? You Might Consider An Offer In Compromise

Issues With The Internal Revenue Service? You Might Consider An Offer In Compromise

An Offer in Compromise, or OIC, is a drafted negotiation with the Internal revenue service for a smaller amount than the whole amount due. Generally, it’s established upon “doubt concerning collectibility” (monetary information that you do not have the means to repay your IRS debts in full inside of a modest period of time). The Internal revenue service employs a strict equation to establish a sufficient settlement amount. A cash offer can be completed when the taxpayer repays the settlement total in full within 90 days of an IRS validation. Short term and long term deferred monthly payment programs are also out there in the event that the taxpayer is not able to repay the negotiated amount in full within 90 days of an IRS acceptance.

A person might qualify for an Offer in Compromise and not know it. IRS Collection Agents might not tell you that you are eligible. Or maybe, a seemingly friendly IRS Agent may offer to “help” you organize and process your own Offer in Compromise simply to uncover the whereabouts of any remaining personal assets. After that, the IRS will use its own formulation against you, reject your Offer in Compromise and request repayment in full or just seize your leftover assets (e.g. cash in your bank account, income and so on.) by way of various collection resources, including a bank or salary levy.

In the event that you speak with a tax lawyer, they should screen you for an OIC. Your legal professional needs to find out if an OIC is perhaps a choice since this may be the only vehicle that will save you a considerable amount of money. If you are eligible, your tax attorney will skillfully prepare your OIC and strongly support your interests until a final resolution is reached. More often than not, the IRS rejects OICs, hoping that once denied, you’ll simply pay. In such cases, you need to file a Notice of Appeal Response immediately after the Offer in Compromise assessment as most Offer in Compromise settlements are normally negotiated and properly reconciled before the IRS Appeals Office.

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